Past Time

Mika Horibuchi | On Kawara | Gabriela Salazar

September 20 – October 21, 2023

Reception: October 13, 6pm – 8pm

Installation view, Past Time, 2023, Efraín López, New York

 

New York, NY – Efraín López is pleased to present Past Time, a group exhibition featuring the work of Mika Horibuchi, On Kawara, and Gabriela Salazar.  Organized by Efraín López, this exhibition includes a diverse array of two-dimensional mixed media and installation work. The exhibition opens Wednesday, September 20, and will continue through October 21, 2023, with a reception taking place on Friday, October 13 from 6–8 pm. 

 

The works in this exhibition engage the materiality of time, provoke the innate human desire for connection across distance, and display the complex fragility of human life. These pieces record moments in time to reveal bonds in personal and shared histories.  In On Kawara’s series I GOT UP (1972), he sends postcards from wherever he was in the world to two friends daily, documenting his location by simply stamping the phrase “I GOT UP” on a postcard, and noting time, date, location, and his own name and address as well as those of the addressee. The series functions as a check-in without explanation: I am alive, I GOT UP.  To add context to the other series in his oeuvre, the artist—who often addresses the notion of time—creates works that live a life of their own independent of the gallery walls. These works are consciously reframed to convey how life happens in the moments between. As we continue to wake, we continue to experience another day of our life searching for connection with those we care about and love.

 

Mika Horibuchi interpolates works of her grandmother to create a series of oil paintings in a trompe-l’oeil style. Since 2017, Horibuchi has been participating in an intimate exchange with her grandmother who, at the age of 83, started watercolor painting, taking classes at a local community center in Hiroshima prefecture, Japan, in an attempt to develop a closer understanding of her granddaughter’s artistic profession. In Watercolor of a Morning Glory and Pink Rose Bouquet (2023) the artist references photographs her grandmother takes of her own water color paintings with a point-and-shoot film camera.

 

Gabriela Salazar’s practice is grounded in the fundamentals of form. Throughout her process, common construction shapes and materials recur in uncommon ways. In the series In Securities (2014-2022), the artist highlights the transformation of everyday objects, creating works consisting of paper security envelopes filled with cast off remnants from previous works in her studio. These sculptures act as timestamps displayed on plinths designed by the artist that elevate the work to chest height using a semi reflective surface on the glass top, close enough to tempt the viewer to touch. The series operates in a modular component to be reconfigured to fit the space in which it is being presented. These envelopes, commonly used to send things securely and retain privacy, are reimagined to conceal through the bonding together of materials. The works are configured to form shapes that stand for themselves while remaining rigid in their objecthood. 

 

Through their engagement with memory, history, connection, and disconnection, these three artists implicate the essential structures of human interaction vis-a-vis an exploration of temporal materiality. 

About the Artists

 

Mika Horibuchi was born in San Francisco, CA and lives and works in Chicago, IL. Horibuchi earned her BFA from the School of the Art Institute in Chicago in 2013. Select solo and two-person exhibitions include Watercolors (2022), Bortolami Gallery, New York, NY; A Tale of Today: Nate Young and Mika Horibuchi (2020), The Driehaus Foundation, Chicago IL; Mika Horibuchi: Chicago Works (2018), Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago IL; and Paintings of Watercolors (2017), PATRON, Chicago IL. Select group exhibitions include The Empathy Lab (2019), Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco, CA; In the Hot Seat (2019), KMAC Museum, Louisville, KY; The Map is Not the Territory (2019), Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago IL; Una Vida Doméstica (2018), Salón ACME, Mexico City, Mexico; On Anxiety (2018), Cleve Carney Art Gallery at the College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL; Good News (2018), Ralph Arnold Gallery at Loyola University, Chicago IL; 8: James Bouché, Andy Delany, Mika Horibuchi, Kara Joslyn, Francesco Lo Castro (2018), LVL3, Chicago, IL; This is a Pipe: Realism and the Found Object in Contemporary Art (2018), Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL; and Council: Mika Horibuchi, David Leggett, Orkideh Torabi, Erin Washington, Caleb Yono, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, IL. She is also co-founder and co-director of 4th Ward Project Space in Chicago, IL. 

 

Gabriela Salazar was born in New York City to architects from Puerto Rico. She has had solo exhibitions at NURTUREart; The Bronx River Arts Center; The Lighthouse Works, Fishers Island; Efrain Lopez Gallery, Chicago; The River Valley Arts Collective at the Al Held Foundation, New York, and with the Climate Museum, in Washington Square Park, NYC. Her work has been included in group shows at Socrates Sculpture Park, the Queens Museum, El Museo del Barrio, The Drawing Center, David Nolan Gallery, Candice Madey Gallery, Storm King Art Center, most recently at the Whitney Museum, in no existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria. Salazar’s work has also appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Hyperallergic, and The Brooklyn Rail. Residencies include Workspace (LMCC); Yaddo, The MacDowell Colony, Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Abrons Arts Center, “Open Sessions” at The Drawing Center, and the Socrates Emerging Artist Fellowship. She holds an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design, a BA from Yale University, and lives, works, and teaches in New York City. 

 

On Kawara was born in Kariya, Japan on December 24, 1932. He was 12 years old when Hiroshima and Nagasaki were bombed, and his earliest paintings—in stark contrast to his uniformly impassive canon—vividly recalled the harrowing fallout. He moved to Tokyo in 1951, and then to Mexico in 1959, where he attended art school and explored the country. For much of his later life, he traveled between New York and Europe and dedicated himself to the sedulous craft of documenting his quotidian life in paintings, newspaper clippings, journals, postcards, telegrams, calendars, and other character-based media. Kawara’s work was also exhibited at several dOCUMENTA events, the Venice Biennale, and the Tokyo Biennale, Kawara’s work is in the permanent collections of the The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Kunstmuseum Basel in Switzerland, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, among others. Kawara died on July 10, 2014 in New York, NY.

New York, NY – Efraín López is pleased to present Past Time, a group exhibition featuring the work of Mika Horibuchi, On Kawara, and Gabriela Salazar.  Organized by Efraín López, this exhibition includes a diverse array of two-dimensional mixed media and installation work. The exhibition opens Wednesday, September 20, and will continue through October 21, 2023, with a reception taking place on Friday, October 13 from 6–8 pm. 

 

The works in this exhibition engage the materiality of time, provoke the innate human desire for connection across distance, and display the complex fragility of human life. These pieces record moments in time to reveal bonds in personal and shared histories.  In On Kawara’s series I GOT UP (1972), he sends postcards from wherever he was in the world to two friends daily, documenting his location by simply stamping the phrase “I GOT UP” on a postcard, and noting time, date, location, and his own name and address as well as those of the addressee. The series functions as a check-in without explanation: I am alive, I GOT UP.  To add context to the other series in his oeuvre, the artist—who often addresses the notion of time—creates works that live a life of their own independent of the gallery walls. These works are consciously reframed to convey how life happens in the moments between. As we continue to wake, we continue to experience another day of our life searching for connection with those we care about and love.

 

Mika Horibuchi interpolates works of her grandmother to create a series of oil paintings in a trompe-l’oeil style. Since 2017, Horibuchi has been participating in an intimate exchange with her grandmother who, at the age of 83, started watercolor painting, taking classes at a local community center in Hiroshima prefecture, Japan, in an attempt to develop a closer understanding of her granddaughter’s artistic profession. In Watercolor of a Morning Glory and Pink Rose Bouquet (2023) the artist references photographs her grandmother takes of her own water color paintings with a point-and-shoot film camera.

 

Gabriela Salazar’s practice is grounded in the fundamentals of form. Throughout her process, common construction shapes and materials recur in uncommon ways. In the series In Securities (2014-2022), the artist highlights the transformation of everyday objects, creating works consisting of paper security envelopes filled with cast off remnants from previous works in her studio. These sculptures act as timestamps displayed on plinths designed by the artist that elevate the work to chest height using a semi reflective surface on the glass top, close enough to tempt the viewer to touch. The series operates in a modular component to be reconfigured to fit the space in which it is being presented. These envelopes, commonly used to send things securely and retain privacy, are reimagined to conceal through the bonding together of materials. The works are configured to form shapes that stand for themselves while remaining rigid in their objecthood. 

 

Through their engagement with memory, history, connection, and disconnection, these three artists implicate the essential structures of human interaction vis-a-vis an exploration of temporal materiality. 

About the Artists

 

Mika Horibuchi was born in San Francisco, CA and lives and works in Chicago, IL. Horibuchi earned her BFA from the School of the Art Institute in Chicago in 2013. Select solo and two-person exhibitions include Watercolors (2022), Bortolami Gallery, New York, NY; A Tale of Today: Nate Young and Mika Horibuchi (2020), The Driehaus Foundation, Chicago IL; Mika Horibuchi: Chicago Works (2018), Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago IL; and Paintings of Watercolors (2017), PATRON, Chicago IL. Select group exhibitions include The Empathy Lab (2019), Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco, CA; In the Hot Seat (2019), KMAC Museum, Louisville, KY; The Map is Not the Territory (2019), Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago IL; Una Vida Doméstica (2018), Salón ACME, Mexico City, Mexico; On Anxiety (2018), Cleve Carney Art Gallery at the College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL; Good News (2018), Ralph Arnold Gallery at Loyola University, Chicago IL; 8: James Bouché, Andy Delany, Mika Horibuchi, Kara Joslyn, Francesco Lo Castro (2018), LVL3, Chicago, IL; This is a Pipe: Realism and the Found Object in Contemporary Art (2018), Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL; and Council: Mika Horibuchi, David Leggett, Orkideh Torabi, Erin Washington, Caleb Yono, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, IL. She is also co-founder and co-director of 4th Ward Project Space in Chicago, IL. 

 

Gabriela Salazar was born in New York City to architects from Puerto Rico. She has had solo exhibitions at NURTUREart; The Bronx River Arts Center; The Lighthouse Works, Fishers Island; Efrain Lopez Gallery, Chicago; The River Valley Arts Collective at the Al Held Foundation, New York, and with the Climate Museum, in Washington Square Park, NYC. Her work has been included in group shows at Socrates Sculpture Park, the Queens Museum, El Museo del Barrio, The Drawing Center, David Nolan Gallery, Candice Madey Gallery, Storm King Art Center, most recently at the Whitney Museum, in no existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria. Salazar’s work has also appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Hyperallergic, and The Brooklyn Rail. Residencies include Workspace (LMCC); Yaddo, The MacDowell Colony, Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Abrons Arts Center, “Open Sessions” at The Drawing Center, and the Socrates Emerging Artist Fellowship. She holds an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design, a BA from Yale University, and lives, works, and teaches in New York City. 

 

On Kawara was born in Kariya, Japan on December 24, 1932. He was 12 years old when Hiroshima and Nagasaki were bombed, and his earliest paintings—in stark contrast to his uniformly impassive canon—vividly recalled the harrowing fallout. He moved to Tokyo in 1951, and then to Mexico in 1959, where he attended art school and explored the country. For much of his later life, he traveled between New York and Europe and dedicated himself to the sedulous craft of documenting his quotidian life in paintings, newspaper clippings, journals, postcards, telegrams, calendars, and other character-based media. Kawara’s work was also exhibited at several dOCUMENTA events, the Venice Biennale, and the Tokyo Biennale, Kawara’s work is in the permanent collections of the The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Kunstmuseum Basel in Switzerland, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, among others. Kawara died on July 10, 2014 in New York, NY.

Installation view, Past Time, 2023, Efraín López, New York

Installation view, Past Time, 2023, Efraín López, New York

Installation view, Past Time, 2023, Efraín López, New York

On Kawara, I GOT UP AT 10.16 A.M. – 19 NOV 1972, 1972, ink on mailed postcard, 3.5 x 5.5 inches
Mika Horibuchi, Watercolor of a Morning Glory and Pink Rose Bouquet, 2023, Oil on linen; digital print, and plastic bag, 11 1/2” x 8 1/2” 
Gabriela Salazar, In Securities, 2014 – 2022, Paper security envelopes and wet studio remnants (black enamel spray paint, silver spray paint, frosted glass spray, shoe polish, iridescent spray paint, wall joint compound, wood glue, wood glue, bondo, plasticine, spray starch, clear silicone, clear silicone, wood putty, wood putty, putty with blue dye, silicone epoxy, damar resin, blue milk paint, gold paint, white silicone, rubber cement).
Gabriela Salazar, In Securities, 2014 – 2022, Paper security envelopes and wet studio remnants (black enamel spray paint, silver spray paint, frosted glass spray, shoe polish, iridescent spray paint, wall joint compound, wood glue, wood glue, bondo, plasticine, spray starch, clear silicone, clear silicone, wood putty, wood putty, putty with blue dye, silicone epoxy, damar resin, blue milk paint, gold paint, white silicone, rubber cement).